See also: Kit, kıt, KIT, кіт, кит, and кит.

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English from the 14th century, from Middle Dutch kitte (a wooden vessel made of hooped staves). Related to Dutch tankard (see below). The further etymology is unknown.

The transfer of meaning to the contents of a soldier's knapsack dates to the late 18th century, extended use of any collection of necessaries used for travelling dates to the first half of the 19th century. The further widening of the sense to a collection of parts sold for the buyer to assemble emerges in US English in the mid 20th century.

NounEdit

kit (plural kits)

  1. A circular wooden vessel, made of hooped staves.
  2. A kind of basket made especially from straw of rushes, especially for holding fish; by extension, the contents of such a basket or similar container, used as a measure of weight.
    • 1961 18 Jan, Guardian (cited after OED):
    He was pushing a barrow on the fish dock, wheeling aluminium kits which, when full, each contain 10 stone of fish.
  3. A collection of items forming the equipment of a soldier, carried in a knapsack.
  4. Any collection of items needed for a specific purpose, especially for use by a workman, or personal effects packed for travelling.
    Always carry a good first-aid kit.
  5. A collection of parts sold for the buyer to assemble.
    I built the entire car from a kit.
  6. (video games) The set of skills and abilities chosen for a playable character.
  7. (Britain, sports) The standard set of clothing, accessories and equipment worn by players.
    • 2011 November 10, Jeremy Wilson, “England Under 21 5 Iceland Under 21 0: match report”, in Telegraph[1]:
      A sell-out crowd of 10,000 then observed perfectly a period of silence before the team revealed their black armbands, complete with stitched-in poppies, for the match. After Fifa’s about-turn, it must have been a frantic few days for the England kit manufacturer. The on-field challenge was altogether more straightforward.
  8. (Britain, informal) Clothing.
    Get your kit off and come to bed.
  9. (computing, informal) A full software distribution, as opposed to a patch or upgrade.
  10. (music) A drum kit.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

kit (third-person singular simple present kits, present participle kitting, simple past and past participle kitted)

  1. (transitive) To assemble or collect something into kits or sets or to give somebody a kit. See also kit out and other derived phrases.
    We need to kit the parts for the assembly by Friday, so that manufacturing can build the tool.

Etymology 2Edit

A short form of kitten. From the 16th century (spelled kytte, kitt). From the 19th century also extended to other young animals (mink, fox, muskrat, etc.), and to a species of small fox ("kit-fox"). Later usage (for other animals) perhaps influenced by chit.

NounEdit

kit (plural kits)

  1. A kitten (young cat).
  2. A kit fox.
  3. A young skunk.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

16th century, perhaps from cithara.

NounEdit

kit (plural kits)

  1. Synonym of kit violin
    • 1681, Nehemiah Grew, Musaeum Regalis Societatis, or, A catalogue & description of the natural and artificial rarities belonging to the Royal Society and preserved at Gresham Colledge
      A dancing master's kit.
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, “(please specify the chapter name)”, in Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, OCLC 999756093:
      Prince Turveydrop then tinkled the strings of his kit with his fingers, and the young ladies stood up to dance.

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from German kitte, kütte (circa 1880).

NounEdit

kit (plural kits)

  1. A school of pigeons, especially domesticated, trained pigeons.

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian кит (kit).

NounEdit

kit

  1. whale (Cetacea)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[2], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From German Kitt (putty).

NounEdit

kit n (singular definite kittet, not used in plural form)

  1. putty

Etymology 2Edit

From English kit (1980).

NounEdit

kit n (singular definite kittet, plural indefinite kit or kits)

  1. kit
InflectionEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Of unknown origin. Possibly borrowed from the dialectal German Kietze (carrying basket), from Proto-Germanic *kitjō-. The German word has also appeared as Kötze, from Middle High German *kœzze, from Proto-Germanic *kut-, which would be related to the root of kot (ramshackle house), itself of non-Indo-European origin.[1]

NounEdit

kit f (plural kitten, diminutive kitje n)

  1. metal can, used mainly for coal
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from German Kitt.

NounEdit

kit f or n (uncountable)

  1. sealant
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from English kit.

NounEdit

kit m (plural kits, diminutive kitje n)

  1. set of tools

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kotze in Kluge's Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, 1891

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

Pronominal adverbs from case suffixes (cf. postpositions)
case suffix who? what? this that he/she
(it)*
v. pr. c.
nom. ki mi ez az ő* / Ø
az / Ø
acc. -t / -ot /
-at / -et / -öt
kit mit ezt azt őt* / Ø
azt / Ø
c1
c2
dat. -nak / -nek kinek minek ennek annak neki neki- c
ins. -val / -vel kivel mivel ezzel/
evvel
azzal/
avval
vele (vele-) c
c-f. -ért kiért miért ezért azért érte c
tra. -vá / -vé kivé mivé ezzé azzá c
ter. -ig meddig eddig addig c
e-f. -ként (kiként) (miként) ekként akként c
e-m. -ul / -ül c
ine. -ban / -ben kiben miben ebben abban benne c
sup. -n/-on/-en/-ön kin min ezen azon rajta (rajta-) c
ade. -nál / -nél kinél minél ennél annál nála c
ill. -ba / -be kibe mibe ebbe abba bele bele- c
sub. -ra / -re kire mire erre arra rá- c
all. -hoz/-hez/-höz kihez mihez ehhez ahhoz hozzá hozzá- c
el. -ból / -ből kiből miből ebből abból belőle c
abl. -ról / -ről kiről miről erről arról róla c
del. -tól / -től kitől mitől ettől attól tőle c
*: Ő and őt refer to human beings; the forms below them might be
construed likewise. – Forms in parentheses are uncommon. All »

EtymologyEdit

ki +‎ -t

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈkit]
  • Hyphenation: kit

PronounEdit

kit

  1. accusative singular of ki
    Kit ajánl?Whom would you recommend?
    Kit érdekel?Who cares?

JehaiEdit

NounEdit

kit

  1. buttocks
    kit tɔm : mouth of the river (literally: buttocks [of the] river)

ReferencesEdit


NzadiEdit

NounEdit

kít (plural kít)

  1. chair

Further readingEdit

  • Crane, Thera; Larry Hyman; Simon Nsielanga Tukumu (2011) A grammar of Nzadi [B.865]: a Bantu language of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, →ISBN

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From German Kitt.

NounEdit

kit m inan

  1. putty (form of cement)
  2. (slang) lie
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

kit f

  1. genitive plural of kita

Further readingEdit

  • kit in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • kit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English kit.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kit m (plural kits)

  1. kit (collection of items needed for a specific purpose)
  2. kit (collection of parts sold for the buyer to assemble)

SynonymsEdit

  • (collection of items for a specific purpose): jogo

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κῆτος (kêtos).

NounEdit

kȉt m (Cyrillic spelling ки̏т)

  1. whale

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

 
Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia hr

SloveneEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek κῆτος (kêtos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kȋt m anim (female equivalent kȋtovka)

  1. whale
InflectionEdit
Masculine anim., hard o-stem
nom. sing. kít
gen. sing. kíta
singular dual plural
nominative kít kíta kíti
accusative kíta kíta kíte
genitive kíta kítov kítov
dative kítu kítoma kítom
locative kítu kítih kítih
instrumental kítom kítoma kíti

Etymology 2Edit

From German Kitt (putty).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kȋt m inan

  1. putty
InflectionEdit
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. kít
gen. sing. kíta
singular dual plural
nominative kít kíta kíti
accusative kít kíta kíte
genitive kíta kítov kítov
dative kítu kítoma kítom
locative kítu kítih kítih
instrumental kítom kítoma kíti

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English kit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kit m (plural kits)

  1. kit
    Synonym: equipo (kit)

Tok PisinEdit

NounEdit

kit

  1. putty

TurkmenEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian кит (kit), from Ancient Greek κῆτος (kêtos).

NounEdit

kit (definite accusative kidi, plural kitler)

  1. whale

DeclensionEdit