U+767E, 百
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-767E

[U+767D]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+767F]
See also: and 𦣻

Contents

TranslingualEdit

Stroke order
 

Han characterEdit

(radical 106 +1, 6 strokes, cangjie input 一日 (MA), four-corner 10600, composition)

ReferencesEdit

  • KangXi: page 785, character 4
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 22679
  • Dae Jaweon: page 1199, character 1
  • Hanyu Da Zidian: volume 4, page 2643, character 1
  • Unihan data for U+767E

ChineseEdit

simp. and trad.
alt. forms financial
𦣻 archaic

Glyph originEdit

Historical forms of the character
Oracle bone script Bronze inscriptions Large seal script Small seal script
       
Characters in the same phonetic series () (Zhengzhang, 2003) 
Old Chinese
*pʰraːɡs, *pʰraːɡ
*pʰraːɡs, *mbraːd
*pʰaːɡ, *pʰraːɡ
*pʰaːɡ
*baːɡ
*baːɡ
*tʰaːɡ, *pʰraːɡ
*prɯɡ
*praːɡ
*praːɡ
*praːɡ
*praːɡ, *pʰraːɡ
*praːɡ
*praːɡ
*pʰraːɡ
*pʰraːɡ
*pʰraːɡ, *ɡeːwʔ
*mpʰraːɡ, *mbraːɡ
*braːɡ
*braːɡ
*braːɡ
*braːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*mbraːɡ
*praɡ, *preɡ
*ɦmreːɡ

Phono-semantic compound (形聲, OC *praːɡ): semantic  + phonetic (OC *braːɡ).

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *b-r-gja.

PronunciationEdit


Note:
  • báh - vernacular ("hundred");
  • báik - literary ("numerous").
Note: pah/peeh, peh/peeh - vernacular, pek/piak - literary.

Rime
Character
Reading # 1/1
Initial () (1)
Final () (113)
Tone (調) Checked (Ø)
Openness (開合) Open
Division () II
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/pˠæk̚/
Pan
Wuyun
/pᵚak̚/
Shao
Rongfen
/pak̚/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/paɨjk̚/
Li
Rong
/pɐk̚/
Wang
Li
/pɐk̚/
Bernard
Karlgren
/pɐk̚/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
bo
Baxter-Sagart system 1.1 (2014)
Character
Reading # 1/1
Modern
Beijing
(Pinyin)
bǎi
Middle
Chinese
‹ pæk ›
Old
Chinese
/*pˤrak/
English hundred

Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter-Sagart system:

* Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
* Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
* Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
* Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;

* Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/1
No. 194
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
0
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*praːɡ/

DefinitionsEdit

  1. hundred
  2. numerous; countless
  3. every; all
  4. entirely; completely; at all
  5. A surname​. Bai (mainland China, Taiwan), Baak, Bak (Hong Kong)

See alsoEdit

Chinese numbers
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 102 103 104 108 1012
Cardinal

亿
Financial




亿

CompoundsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Sino-Xenic ():

JapaneseEdit

KanjiEdit

(grade 1 “Kyōiku” kanji)

ReadingsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Kanji in this term
ひゃく
Grade: 1
on'yomi

Borrowing from Middle Chinese (pæk, hundred).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

‎(hiragana ひゃく, romaji hyaku)

  1. hundred
  2. a very many, lots, a lot
  3. one hundred years old, advanced age
Usage notesEdit

This is the most common term for hundred in modern Japanese.

IdiomsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Kanji in this term
もも
Grade: 1
kun'yomi

/mo1mo1//momo/

From Old Japanese.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

‎(hiragana もも, romaji momo)

  1. (archaic) hundred
  2. (archaic) a very many
Usage notesEdit

While ho or o is only used in compounds, momo can be used on its own.[2]

Archaic. Generally only found in set phrases or compounds.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Kanji in this term

Grade: 1
kun'yomi

/po//ɸo//ho/

From Old Japanese.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

‎(hiragana , romaji ho)

  1. (obsolete) hundred
  2. (obsolete) a very many
Usage notesEdit

While momo can be used on its own, ho is only used in compounds, where it has lost the initial consonant and appears instead as o (see below). Generally only used in reference to multiple hundreds of things, as in terms 五百(io, five hundred; a very many) or 八百(yao, eight hundred; a very many).[2]

Obsolete. Superseded by o (see below).

Etymology 4Edit

Kanji in this term

Grade: 1
kun'yomi

/po//ɸo//ho//o/

From Old Japanese. Change in pronunciation from ho (see above).[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

‎(hiragana , romaji o, historical hiragana )

  1. (archaic) hundred
  2. (archaic) a very many
Usage notesEdit

While momo can be used on its own, o is only used in compounds. This o was originally pronounced ho (see above). Generally only used in reference to multiple hundreds of things, as in terms 五百(io, five hundred; a very many) or 八百(yao, eight hundred; a very many).[2]

Archaic. Generally only found in set phrases and compounds.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, ISBN 4-385-13905-9
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan

KoreanEdit

HanjaEdit

‎(baek, maek)
Eumhun:

  • Sound (hangeul): ,  (revised: baek, maek, McCune-Reischauer: paek, maek, Yale: payk, mayk)
  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

VietnameseEdit

Han characterEdit

(bách, , tình)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.