EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Contraction of and.

ConjunctionEdit

’n

  1. Nonstandard spelling of ’n’.
    fish 'n chips
    rock 'n roll

Etymology 2Edit

Contraction of than.

ConjunctionEdit

’n

  1. Eye dialect spelling of than.
    • 1865, Mark Twain, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County
      The feller took the box again, and took another long, particular look, and give it back to Smiley, and says, very deliberate, "Well, I don’t see no p’ints about that frog that's any better’n any other frog."
    • 1969, Anne Warner, Susan Clegg and her friend Mrs. Lathrop (page 87)
      She says you may laugh ’f you feel so inclined, but there ain’t no such big difference between your leg ’n’ a dead rat but what it ’ll pay you to mark her words. She says ’f it don’t do no more ’n eat the skin off it ’ll still be pretty hard for you to lay there without no skin ’n’ feel the plaster goin’ in more ’n’ more.
    • 2010, Arnan Heyden, Daughters of Agendale (page 228)
      What I can give ya is this bit o’ knowledge: there be things in this world that no one can explain. There are things bigger ’n mountains, bigger ’n oceans, bigger ’n fields an’ night skies filled with stars, bigger ’n kings, or queens…

Etymology 3Edit

Contraction of own.

AdjectiveEdit

’n

  1. Eye dialect spelling of own.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady, volume 1, edition reprint, 6th, published 1768, Letter 32, page 270:
      I will not show him this letter of yours though you seem to desire it, lest it should provoke him to be too severe a schoolmaster, when you are his’n.
    • 1776, Samuel Foote, The Capuchin, T. Sherlock for T. Cadell, published 1778, (rev. ed. of A Trip to Calais: a comedy in three acts, premiered 1776), page 102:
      Eating ! sure your honour does not think their wictuals are better than our’n.
    • 1862, Mayne Reid, The Maroon, edition reprint, London: Ward and Lock, published 1864, Chapter VII “The Foolah Prince”, page 31–32:
      “Forty there [are...] Twenty on ’em I’m to have for fetchin’ him acrost. [...The other twenty] are his’n. He’s brought ’em with him to swop for the sister—when he finds her.”
    • 1883, Bill Nye, Baled Hay: A drier book than Walt Whitman’s “Leaves o’ Grass”, edition reprint, F. F. Lovell & Co., published 1884, page 175:
      We have met the enemy, and we are his’n. [Antecedent to "We have met the enemy and he is us."]
Usage notesEdit

Most commonly seen in his ’n (his own) or our ’n (our own).


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch een, 'n.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

'n (indefinite)

  1. a (indefinite article), any indefinite example of.

CatalanEdit

PronounEdit

’n

  1. Contraction of ne.

DeclensionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

’n

  1. Contraction of een.

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

’n

  1. (colloquial) contraction of ein (“a”)

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

’n

  1. (colloquial) short for denn (used for general emphasis)
    Wann wärst’n hier?So, when would you be here?

Low GermanEdit

ArticleEdit

’n

  1. Contraction of den.

PronounEdit

’n

  1. Contraction of en.

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

ParticleEdit

’n

  1. Alternative form of yn (used after a vowel).
    Mae hi’n darllen. — She is reading.
    Mae hi’n gysglyd. — She is sleepy.
    Mae hi’n ferch. — She is a girl.

Etymology 2Edit

Contraction of ein (our).

DeterminerEdit

'n

  1. our (used after vowels).
Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 18:16