U+8EAB, 身
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-8EAB

[U+8EAA]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+8EAC]
U+2F9D, ⾝
KANGXI RADICAL BODY

[U+2F9C]
Kangxi Radicals
[U+2F9E]

TranslingualEdit

Stroke order
 
Stroke order
 

Han characterEdit

(radical 158, +0, 7 strokes, cangjie input 竹X竹 (HXH), four-corner 27400)

  1. Kangxi radical #158, .

Derived charactersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • KangXi: page 1237, character 1
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 38034
  • Dae Jaweon: page 1709, character 36
  • Hanyu Da Zidian (first edition): volume 6, page 3807, character 1
  • Unihan data for U+8EAB

ChineseEdit

simp. and trad.

Glyph originEdit

Historical forms of the character
Shang Western Zhou Warring States Shuowen Jiezi (compiled in Han) Liushutong (compiled in Ming)
Oracle bone script Bronze inscriptions Chu Slip and silk script Small seal script Transcribed ancient scripts
         

Pictogram (象形): from a pictograph of a pregnant woman.

Etymology 1Edit

STEDT relates it to Proto-Sino-Tibetan *sja-n ~ *sin (flesh; animal; body), but recent Old Chinese reconstructions would not support this etymology.

Because is used as a phonetic for (OC *niŋ) in excavated texts, Baxter and Sagart (2012, 2014) reconstruct the initial as nasal. This would allow for a comparison to Tibetan སྙིང (snying, heart), Japhug tɯ-sni (heart) (Baxter and Sagart, 2012; Zhang, Jacques and Lai, 2019), which are from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s/k-n(j)i-k/ŋ (heart; mind; brain).

PronunciationEdit


Note:
  • sin - literary;
  • sian - vernacular.
Note:
  • sing1 - Chaozhou, Shantou;
  • sêng1 - Jieyang.
  • Wu
  • Xiang

    • Dialectal data
    Variety Location
    Mandarin Beijing /ʂən⁵⁵/
    Harbin /ʂən⁴⁴/
    Tianjin /ʂən²¹/
    /sən²¹/
    Jinan /ʂẽ²¹³/
    Qingdao /ʃə̃²¹³/
    Zhengzhou /ʂən²⁴/
    Xi'an /ʂẽ²¹/
    Xining /ʂə̃⁴⁴/
    Yinchuan /ʂəŋ⁴⁴/
    Lanzhou /ʂə̃n³¹/
    Ürümqi /ʂɤŋ⁴⁴/
    Wuhan /sən⁵⁵/
    Chengdu /sən⁵⁵/
    Guiyang /sen⁵⁵/
    Kunming /ʂə̃⁴⁴/
    Nanjing /ʂən³¹/
    Hefei /ʂən²¹/
    Jin Taiyuan /səŋ¹¹/
    Pingyao /ʂəŋ¹³/
    Hohhot /sə̃ŋ³¹/
    Wu Shanghai /səŋ⁵³/
    Suzhou /sən⁵⁵/
    Hangzhou /sen³³/
    Wenzhou /saŋ³³/
    Hui Shexian /ɕiʌ̃³¹/
    Tunxi /ɕian¹¹/
    Xiang Changsha /ʂən³³/
    Xiangtan /sən³³/
    Gan Nanchang /sɨn⁴²/
    Hakka Meixian /sən⁴⁴/
    Taoyuan /ʃen²⁴/
    Cantonese Guangzhou /sɐn⁵³/
    Nanning /sɐn⁵⁵/
    Hong Kong /sɐn⁵⁵/
    Min Xiamen (Min Nan) /sin⁵⁵/
    /sian⁵⁵/
    Fuzhou (Min Dong) /siŋ⁴⁴/
    Jian'ou (Min Bei) /seiŋ⁵⁴/
    Shantou (Min Nan) /siŋ³³/
    Haikou (Min Nan) /tin²³/

    Rime
    Character
    Reading # 1/1
    Initial () (26)
    Final () (43)
    Tone (調) Level (Ø)
    Openness (開合) Open
    Division () III
    Fanqie
    Reconstructions
    Zhengzhang
    Shangfang
    /ɕiɪn/
    Pan
    Wuyun
    /ɕin/
    Shao
    Rongfen
    /ɕjen/
    Edwin
    Pulleyblank
    /ɕin/
    Li
    Rong
    /ɕiĕn/
    Wang
    Li
    /ɕĭĕn/
    Bernard
    Karlgren
    /ɕi̯ĕn/
    Expected
    Mandarin
    Reflex
    shēn
    Expected
    Cantonese
    Reflex
    san1
    BaxterSagart system 1.1 (2014)
    Character
    Reading # 1/1
    Modern
    Beijing
    (Pinyin)
    shēn
    Middle
    Chinese
    ‹ syin ›
    Old
    Chinese
    /*n̥i[ŋ]/
    English body; self

    Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter–Sagart system:

    * Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
    * Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
    * Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
    * Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;

    * Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
    Zhengzhang system (2003)
    Character
    Reading # 1/1
    No. 11247
    Phonetic
    component
    Rime
    group
    Rime
    subdivision
    1
    Corresponding
    MC rime
    Old
    Chinese
    /*qʰjin/
    Notes

    DefinitionsEdit

    1. (anatomy) body
    2. (figuratively) body; main part
    3. pregnancy
    4. oneself
    5. in person; personally
    6. I; me
    7. life; one's (entire) life
    8. social status
    9. moral character
    10. Classifier for suits of clothes.

    SynonymsEdit

    Etymology 2Edit

    PronunciationEdit


    DefinitionsEdit

    1. Only used in 身毒 (Juāndú).

    CompoundsEdit


    JapaneseEdit

    KanjiEdit

    (grade 3 “Kyōiku” kanji)

    1. body
      Synonym:
    2. identity

    ReadingsEdit

    CompoundsEdit

    Etymology 1Edit

    Kanji in this term

    Grade: 3
    kun’yomi

    From Old Japanese. Cognate with (mi, seed, fruit, offspring).[1]

    Standalone form of mu below. May derive as mu + (i, emphatic nominative particle). See also the etymology of (kami, kamu).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    () (mi

    1. a body; (by extension):
      1. the main part of something
        1. the blade of a sword (as opposed to the handle)
        2. meat, flesh (as opposed to skin and bone)
        3. wood (as opposed to the bark)
      2. oneself
      3. one's position, one's social standing, one's circumstances

    Derived termsEdit

    Etymology 2Edit

    Kanji in this term

    Grade: 3
    kun’yomi

    From Old Japanese. Bound form of mi above, only found in compounds.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    () (mu

    1. (only in compounds) a body
    Derived termsEdit

    Etymology 3Edit

    Kanji in this term
    むくろ
    Grade: 3
    kun’yomi

    From Old Japanese. Compound of (mu, body, bound form of standalone mi) +‎ くろ (kuro). The derivation of the kuro element is uncertain, but it might be an alteration or ancient form of (kara, trunk, main part).[1]

    PronunciationEdit

    Alternative formsEdit

    NounEdit

    (むくろ) (mukuro

    1. a living body
      • 720, 日本書紀 (Nihon Shoki, “Chronicles of Japan”), Volume 7, in the section on 景行天皇 (Keikō-tennō, Emperor Keikō):
        長大
        (ひと)となり、むくろ(たか)(おお)きにして
        hitotonari, mukuro takaku ōki ni shite
        His personality and body were lofty and great
    2. a dead body, a corpse
      • 14th century, 太平記 (Taiheiki):
        御首(おんくび)敷皮(しきかは)(うえ)()ちて(むくろ)(なほ)()せるが(ごと)
        onkubi wa shikikawa no ue ni ochite mukuro wa naozaseru ga gotoshi
        The head fell onto the hide rug, and the corpse looked as if it were sitting straight...
    3. a rotten tree trunk

    Derived termsEdit

    Etymology 4Edit

    Kanji in this term
    しん
    Grade: 3
    on’yomi

    From Middle Chinese (syin, body, self).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    (しん) (shin

    1. a body
    Usage notesEdit

    Seldom used on its own. In isolation, the reading mi is much more common.

    Derived termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit

    1. 1.0 1.1 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan
    2. 2.0 2.1 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN

    KoreanEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Middle Chinese (MC ɕiɪn). Recorded as Middle Korean  (Yale: sin) in Hunmong Jahoe (訓蒙字會 / 훈몽자회), 1527.

    HanjaEdit

    Korean Wikisource has texts containing the hanja:

    Wikisource

    (eumhun (mom sin))

    1. Hanja form? of (body).

    CompoundsEdit

    ReferencesEdit

    • 국제퇴계학회 대구경북지부 (國際退溪學會 大邱慶北支部) (2007). Digital Hanja Dictionary, 전자사전/電子字典. [1]

    VietnameseEdit

    Han characterEdit

    : Hán Nôm readings: thân

    1. Hán tự form of thân (torso).