Wiktionary:Word of the day/Archive/2021/February

2021
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1Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 1
adulterate adj (archaic, literary)
  1. Corrupted or made impure by being mixed with something else; adulterated.
  2. Tending to commit adultery; relating to or being the product of adultery; adulterous.

adulterate v

  1. (transitive) To corrupt, to debase (someone or something).
  2. (transitive) To make less valuable or spoil (something) by adding impurities or other substances.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To commit adultery with (someone).
  4. (transitive, archaic) To defile (someone) by adultery.
  5. (intransitive, also figuratively, archaic) To commit adultery.
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2Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 2
ambit n
  1. (obsolete) Chiefly in the plural form ambits: the open space surrounding a building, town, etc.; the grounds or precincts of a place.
  2. (archaic) The boundary around a building, town, region, etc.
  3. (archaic, rare) The circumference of something circular; also, an arc; a circuit, an orbit.
  4. (by extension)
    1. The extent of actions, thoughts, or the meaning of words, etc.
    2. The area or sphere of control and influence of something.
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3Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 3
ride roughshod over v
  1. (transitive, idiomatic) To treat (someone) roughly or without care, control, moderation, or respect; to act in a bullying manner toward (someone); to damage (someone or something).
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4Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 4
binimetinib n
  1. (pharmacology) A drug with the molecular formula C₁₇H₁₅BrF₂N₄O₃ that inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), and is approved for use in combination with encorafenib to treat certain melanomas.

  Today is World Cancer Day, which is recognized by the United Nations to raise awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment.

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5Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 5
performant adj
  1. Of or relating to performance.
  2. Capable of or characterized by a high or excellent level of performance or efficiency.
    1. (computing slang) Characterized by a level of performance or efficiency that is adequate for or exceeds the expectations of end users.

performant n

  1. (obsolete, rare) Someone who performs something, such as a ritual; a performer.
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9Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 9
forsake v
  1. (transitive) To abandon, to give up, to leave (permanently), to renounce (someone or something).
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To decline or refuse (something offered).
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To avoid or shun (someone or something).
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To cause disappointment to; to be insufficient for (someone or something).
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10Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 10
pulse n
  1. (uncountable) Annual leguminous plants (such as beans, lentils, and peas) yielding grains or seeds used as food for humans or animals; (countable) such a plant; a legume.
  2. (uncountable) Edible grains or seeds from leguminous plants, especially in a mature, dry condition; (countable) a specific kind of such a grain or seed.

[...]

  1. (physiology)
    1. A normally regular beat felt when arteries near the skin (for example, at the neck or wrist) are depressed, caused by the heart pumping blood through them.
    2. The nature or rate of this beat as an indication of a person's health.
  2. (figuratively) A beat or throb; also, a repeated sequence of such beats or throbs.
  3. (figuratively) The focus of energy or vigour of an activity, place, or thing; also, the feeling of bustle, busyness, or energy in a place; the heartbeat.
  4. (chiefly biology, chemistry) An (increased) amount of a substance (such as a drug or an isotopic label) given over a short time.
  5. (cooking, chiefly attributively) A setting on a food processor which causes it to work in a series of short bursts rather than continuously, in order to break up ingredients without liquidizing them; also, a use of this setting.
  6. (music, prosody) The beat or tactus of a piece of music or verse; also, a repeated sequence of such beats.
  7. (physics)
    1. A brief burst of electromagnetic energy, such as light, radio waves, etc.
    2. Synonym of autosoliton (a stable solitary localized structure that arises in nonlinear spatially extended dissipative systems due to mechanisms of self-organization)
    3. (also electronics) A brief increase in the strength of an electrical signal; an impulse.

pulse v

  1. (transitive, also figuratively) To emit or impel (something) in pulses or waves.
  2. (transitive, chiefly biology, chemistry) To give to (something, especially a cell culture) an (increased) amount of a substance, such as a drug or an isotopic label, over a short time.
  3. (transitive, cooking) To operate a food processor on (some ingredient) in short bursts, to break it up without liquidizing it.
  4. (transitive, electronics, physics)
    1. To apply an electric current or signal that varies in strength to (something).
    2. To manipulate (an electric current, electromagnetic wave, etc.) so that it is emitted in pulses.
  5. (intransitive, chiefly figuratively and literary) To expand and contract repeatedly, like an artery when blood is flowing though it, or the heart; to beat, to throb, to vibrate, to pulsate.
  6. (intransitive, figuratively) Of an activity, place, or thing: to bustle with energy and liveliness; to pulsate.

  Today is World Pulses Day, which was established by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to recognize the importance of pulses as a global food.

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11Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 11
thimble n
  1. (sewing) A pitted, now usually metal, cup-shaped cap worn on the tip of a finger, which is used in sewing to push the needle through material.
  2. As much as fills a thimble (sense 1); a thimbleful.
  3. (also attributively) An object which resembles a thimble (sense 1) in shape or size.
    1. (games) A thimble or similar object used in thimblerig (a game of skill which requires the bettor to guess under which of three thimbles or small cups a pea-sized object has been placed after the person operating the game rapidly rearranges them).
    2. (technology) A socket in machinery shaped like a thimble.
  4. (nautical) A metal ring which a cable or rope intended for attaching to other things is looped around as a protection against chafing.
  5. (technology) A ring- or tube-shaped component such as a ferrule.

thimble v

  1. (intransitive) To use a thimble (noun sense 1).
  2. (intransitive, by extension) To sew.
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12Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 12
Darwinian adj
  1. Senses relating to Charles and Erasmus Darwin.
    1. Of or pertaining to the scientific views advanced by the English biologist, geologist, and naturalist Charles Darwin, especially his theory that living organisms evolve through the natural selection of inherited variations that increase organisms' ability to compete, survive, and reproduce.
    2. (by extension) Of or pertaining to Darwinism, which includes the theories of Charles Darwin and other scientists.
    3. (by extension) Competitive, especially in a ruthless manner.
    4. (by extension) Exhibiting an ability to adapt or develop in order to survive; adaptable.
    5. (chiefly historical) Of or pertaining to the philosophical and scientific views, or poetic style, of the natural philosopher, physiologist, and poet Erasmus Darwin.
  2. Of or pertaining to Darwin, the capital city of the Northern Territory, Australia.

Darwinian n

  1. Senses relating to Charles and Erasmus Darwin.
    1. An adherent of Charles Darwin's theory of the origin of species, or of Darwinism.
    2. (obsolete, rare) An adherent of the philosophical and scientific views, or poetic style, of Erasmus Darwin.
  2. A native or resident of Darwin in the Northern Territory, Australia.

  English biologist, geologist, and naturalist Charles Darwin, who is best known for his contributions towards the science of evolution, was born on this day in 1809.

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13Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 13
love-hate adj
  1. (originally psychoanalysis) Of a relationship: involving feelings of both love and hate, often simultaneously.

love-hate v

  1. (transitive) To feel both love and hate (for someone or something), often simultaneously.

  Today is the eve of Valentine’s Day.

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14Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 14
courtship n
  1. (countable, uncountable) The act of paying court, that is, demonstrating such politeness and respect as is traditionally given at a court (a formal assembly of a sovereign's retinue).
    1. (obsolete) The ceremonial performance of acts of courtesy to a dignitary, etc.
    2. The act of wooing a person to enter into a romantic relationship or marriage; hence, the period during which a couple fall in love before their marriage.
    3. (by extension) The behaviour exhibited by a male animal to attract a mate.
    4. (figuratively) The act of trying to solicit a favour or support from someone.
  2. (countable, uncountable, obsolete) Elegance or propriety of manners fitting for a court; courtliness; (by extension) courteous or polite behaviour; courtesy.
  3. (uncountable, obsolete) The pursuit of being a courtier, such as exercising diplomacy, finesse, etc.; also, the artifices and intrigues of a court; courtcraft.

  Happy Valentine’s Day from all of us at the English Wiktionary!

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15Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 15
sphexish adj
  1. (philosophy) Of animal behaviour: deterministic, preprogrammed.

  Douglas Hofstadter, the American scientist and scholar of comparative literature who coined the word, was born on this day in 1945.

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19Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 19
sandhog n
  1. (US, slang, also figuratively) A person employed to dig tunnels, or (more generally) to work underground or under water.

sandhog v

  1. (intransitive, US, slang) To work at digging tunnels, or (more generally) underground or under water.
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20Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 20
fair-minded adj
  1. Impartial and unbiased.

  Today is the World Day of Social Justice, which is recognized by the United Nations to acknowledge the need to promote social justice, including efforts to tackle issues such as exclusion, gender equality, human rights, poverty, social protections, and unemployment.

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21Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 21
Wanderwort n
  1. (linguistics) A loanword that has spread to many different languages, often through trade or the adoption of foreign cultural practices.

  Today is International Mother Language Day, which is recognized by the United Nations to promote linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism.

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22Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 22
deduce v
  1. (transitive) To reach (a conclusion) by applying rules of logic or other forms of reasoning to given premises or known facts.
  2. (transitive) To examine, explain, or record (something) in an orderly manner.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To obtain (something) from some source; to derive.
  4. (intransitive, archaic) To be derived or obtained from some source.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To take away (something); to deduct, to subtract (something).
  6. (transitive, obsolete, based on the word’s Latin etymon) To lead (something) forth.
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23Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 23
short shrift n
  1. (countable, uncountable, chiefly Roman Catholicism, historical) A rushed sacrament of confession given to a prisoner who is to be executed very soon.
  2. (chiefly uncountable, by extension) Speedy execution, usually without any proper determination of guilt.
  3. (countable, by extension) A short interval of relief or time.
  4. (chiefly uncountable, figuratively) Sometimes preceded by the: a quick dismissal or rejection, especially one which is impolite and undertaken without proper consideration.
  5. (chiefly uncountable, figuratively, dated) Something dealt with or overcome quickly and without difficulty; something made short work of.
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24Edit

25Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 25
waterworks n (plural only)
  1. The water supply system of a district, town, city, or other place, including reservoirs, pipes, and pumps.
  2. (treated as singular) Any single facility, such as a filtration plant or pumping station, within such a system.
  3. (figuratively)
    1. (informal) Often in the form turn on the waterworks: crying or tears, especially in a way that is considered manipulative or over-emotional.
    2. (informal) Rain.
    3. (Britain, euphemistic) The genitourinary system.
  4. (historical, treated as singular) A hydraulic apparatus by which a supply of water is furnished for ornamental purposes; also, an ornamental fountain or waterfall.
  5. (construction, archaic) Engineering works relating to the conveyance and flow of fluids (principally water), such as the collection and distribution of water, drainage, irrigation, etc.
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26Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 26
appeal v
  1. (law)
    1. (intransitive) Often followed by against (the inferior court's decision) or to (the superior court): to apply to a superior court or judge for a decision or order by an inferior court or judge to be reviewed and overturned.
    2. (transitive, originally US) To apply to a superior court or judge to review and overturn (a decision or order by an inferior court or judge).
    3. (transitive, historical) To accuse or charge (someone) with wrongdoing (especially treason).
    4. (transitive, historical) Of a private person: to instituted legal proceedings (against another private person) for some heinous crime, demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered.
    5. (transitive, historical) Of the accomplice of a felon: to make an accusation at common law against (the felon).
  2. (intransitive) To call upon a person or an authority to corroborate a statement, to decide a controverted question, or to vindicate one's rights; to entreat, to invoke.
    1. (intransitive, cricket) Of a fielding side; to ask an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not, usually by saying "How's that?" or "Howzat?".
  3. (intransitive) To call upon someone for a favour, help, etc.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To have recourse or resort to some physical means.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To be attractive.
  6. (transitive, historical) To summon (someone) to defend their honour in a duel, or their innocence in a trial by combat; to challenge.

appeal n

  1. (law)
    1. An application to a superior court or judge for a decision or order by an inferior court or judge to be reviewed and overturned.
    2. The legal document or form by which such an application is made; also, the court case in which the application is argued.
    3. A person's legal right to apply to court for such a review.
    4. (historical) An accusation or charge against someone for wrongdoing (especially treason).
    5. (historical) A process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offence against the public; an accusation.
    6. (historical) At common law, an accusation made against a felon by one of their accomplices (called an approver).
  2. A call to a person or an authority for a decision, help, or proof; an entreaty, an invocation.
    1. (cricket) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not.
  3. (figuratively) A resort to some physical means; a recourse.
  4. (figuratively) A power to attract or interest.
  5. (rhetoric) A call to, or the use of, a principle or quality for purposes of persuasion.
  6. (historical) A summons to defend one's honour in a duel, or one's innocence in a trial by combat; a challenge.
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27Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 27
mugwump n (chiefly US, also attributively)
  1. (chiefly humorous) A (male) leader; an important (male) person.
  2. (politics)
    1. (historical) A member of the Republican Party who declined to support the party's nominee James G. Blaine (1830–1893) during the 1884 United States presidential election, believing him to be corrupt, and instead supported the Democratic Party's candidate Grover Cleveland (1837–1908).
    2. (by extension) A person who purports to stay aloof from party politics.
    3. (by extension) One who switches from supporting one political party to another, especially for personal benefit.
  3. (by extension, colloquial, somewhat derogatory) A person who stays neutral or non-committal; a fence sitter; also, a person who maintains an aloof and often self-important demeanour.

mugwump v (chiefly US)

  1. (intransitive) To behave like a mugwump.
  2. (intransitive) To purport to stay aloof and independent, especially from party politics.

  The American political activist, author, and lawyer Ralph Nader was born on this day in 1934. He ran for President of the United States unsuccessfully four times, with the Green Party in 1996 and 2000, the Reform Party in 2004, and as an independent in 2008.

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28Edit

 

Word of the day
for February 28
coelanaglyphic adj
  1. (sculpture) In the form of cavo-rilievo (sculpture in relief within a sinking made for the purpose, so no part of it projects beyond the surrounding surface).
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